White House Call with Native Youth to Recap the Tribal Youth Gathering

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Dear Tribal Youth,

The White House would like to thank you for making the first-ever White House Tribal Youth Gathering on July 9th a huge success!  We’d like to personally express our gratitude to all who were able to attend in-person, who watched at one of the dozens of watch parties that took place nation-wide, and to all of those who have accepted the Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) Challenge!

We’d like to invite you to participate in a conference call to recap the historic White House Tribal Youth Gathering, get your feedback, and discuss some of the federal resources the government will be offering to Native youth as well as resources offered by organizations that support Gen-I.

We hope you’ll join us this coming Monday, August 10th, at 7:00pm Eastern Time (other time zones listed below).

Please use the following dial-in information in order to access the call. Space is limited, so dial in 5-10 minutes early in order to secure a spot!

What: White House Native Youth Call to Re-Cap the White House Tribal Youth Gathering

When: Monday August 10th, 2015, 7:00pm Eastern Time

Dial-in Number: 1-855-845-4321
Conference Code: 600768

(Please note that this call is off the record and not for press purposes.)

Call Time by Time Zone:

EASTERN TIME: 7:00PM

CENTRAL TIME: 6:00PM

MOUNTAIN TIME: 5:00PM

PACIFIC TIME: 4:00PM

ALASKA STANDARD TIME: 3:00PM

HAWAIIAN TIME: 1:00PM

U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker and Aspen Institute President and CEO Walter Isaacson launched the Communities that Work Partnership, a brand new joint project aimed at accelerating industry-led workforce development and training efforts.

Secretary Pritzker has made skills and workforce development a top priority for the Department of Commerce, and is working with the private sector and government leaders at all levels as part of the ‘Skills for Business’ initiative to prepare workers with the training needed to secure the 21st century jobs business leaders are seeking to fill.

At today’s event, it was announced that AspenWSI has published a website with information about the initiative here. Their national selection committee will competitively select six teams from different regions. AspenWSI will document the strategies and lessons learned from these six original teams and provide new learning tools and case studies that can help communities and regions across the nation develop their talent pipelines to fill in-demand jobs.

AspenWSI was selected from among a dozen other applicants to partner with Commerce because of its proven track record and innovative work with workforce and leadership development.

About the U.S. Economic Development Administration (www.eda.gov)
The mission of the U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) is to lead the federal economic development agenda by promoting competitiveness and preparing the nation’s regions for growth and success in the worldwide economy. An agency within the U.S. Department of Commerce, EDA makes investments in economically distressed communities in order to create jobs for U.S. workers, promote American innovation, and accelerate long-term sustainable economic growth.

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, DC. Its mission is to foster leadership based on enduring values and to provide a nonpartisan venue for dealing with critical issues. The Institute has campuses in Aspen, Colorado, and on the Wye River on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. It also maintains offices in New York City and has an international network of partners. www.aspeninstitute.org

Key Facts for Prospective Applicants

  • National Webinar for Prospective Applicants: May 13, 2015, 2:00-3:30 p.m. EDT. To watch the recording click here.
  • Requests to Participate Due Date: June 5, 2015, by 5:00 p.m. EDT
  • Selection Announcement: July 13, 2015
  • Opening Learning Exchange Retreat: September 14-16, 2015, at The Aspen Institute’s Wye River conference center near Baltimore, MD
  • Resources: Travel and lodging for 3-4 registered members of each selected regional collaborative to participate in two learning exchange retreats, ongoing strategic coaching, and access to a pool of customized technical assistance services
  • Period of Performance: July 2015 to September 2016
  • Contact for Questions: Bill Browning, AspenWSI, at Bill.Browning@Aspeninst.org

 

U.S. Department of Education Announces $3 Million In Grants Available to Help Native Youth  

The U.S. Department of Education today announced the availability of an estimated $3 million in grants to help Native American youth become college- and career-ready. Funding for the new Native Youth Community Projects is a key step toward implementing President Obama’s commitment to improving the lives of American Indian and Alaskan Native children. The new grants will support the President’s Generation Indigenous “Gen I” Initiative launched last year to help Native American youth.

“We know that tribes are in the best position to determine the needs and barriers that Native youth face,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “The Native Youth Community Projects will allow tribal communities to come together to improve outcomes for students.”

In a Federal Register notice, the Department said it would award five to seven demonstration grants ranging from $400,000 to $600,000 to tribal communities before Sept. 30. The new program is based on significant consultation with tribal communities and recognizes that these communities are best-positioned to:

  • Identify key barriers to improving educational and life outcomes for Native youth, and
  • Develop and implement locally produced strategies designed to address those barriers.

Each grant will support a coordinated, focused approach chosen by a community partnership that includes a tribe, local schools and other optional service providers or organizations. For example, the program allows tribes to identify ways to achieve college and career readiness specific to their own communities – whether it’s early learning, language immersion or mental health services.  Communities can tailor actions to address one or more of those issues. The success of these first projects will guide the work of future practices that improve the educational opportunities and achievement of preschool, elementary and secondary Indian students.

The President’s FY 2016 budget proposal calls for increased investments across Indian Country, including a total request of $20.8 billion for a range of federal programs that serve tribes – a $1.5 billion increase over the 2015-enacted level. The budget proposal includes $53 million for fiscal year 2016 – a $50 million increase from this year – to significantly expand the Native Youth Community Projects program.

For more on the Administration’s investment in Native American issues, visit https://www.whitehouse.gov/nativeamericans.

White House to Host Tribal Youth Gathering

WASHINGTON, DC – On Thursday, July 9, 2015, the White House will host the first-ever White House Tribal Youth Gathering in Washington, DC, to provide American Indian and Alaska Native youth from across the country the opportunity to interact directly with senior Administration officials and the White House Council on Native American Affairs.

The Tribal Youth Gathering, a collaboration between the White House and Unity Inc., will continue to build upon the President’s Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) initiative and his commitment to improve the lives of Native youth across the country. President Obama launched the Gen-I initiative at the 2014 White House Tribal Nations Conference to focus on improving the lives of Native youth through new investments and increased engagement. This initiative takes a comprehensive, culturally appropriate approach to ensure all young Native people can reach their full potential.

The Gen-I Native Youth Challenge invites Native youth and organizations across the country to become a part of the Administration’s Gen-I initiative by joining the National Native Youth Network — a White House effort in partnership with the Aspen Institute’s Center for Native American Youth and the U.S. Department of the Interior. Youth who complete the Gen-I Native Youth Challenge will be eligible to register for a chance to attend the upcoming White House Tribal Youth Gathering. The application to attend the Gathering can be found HERE. Additional details about the conference will be released at a later date.

The Deadline for the Gen-I Challenge Has Been Extended!

UPDATE: The deadline has been extended for youth who sign up for the Gen-I Youth Challenge to be eligible to attend the 2015 White House Tribal Youth Gathering in Washington, DC this summer!

CLICK HERE TO ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE TODAY!
https://aspeninstitute.wufoo.com/forms/geni-native-youth-challenge/

By signing up for the Gen-I Youth Challenge, you are agreeing to take the following steps to create positive change in your community:

Step 1: ACT. Within 30 days of accepting the challenge, work with other youth in your community or at your school to do something positive of your choosing (for example: do a volunteer project with a local organization or charity, visit with elders in your community, or become a mentor to a younger person). You can use Toolkits from the National Native Youth Network and their partners to help you in this work.  Your local tribal youth council, urban tribal youth group, or Native youth organization may also be resources.

Step 2:  CAPTURE. Document your community efforts through a short summary (3-4 sentences) and with photos and video!

Step 3: SHARE. Share your story online using #Gen-I and send to the National Native Youth Network here.  The National Native Youth Networkor the White House may even feature your story!

Step 4: PARTICIPATE. By participating in the National Native Youth Network, you may be invited to apply to send a representative to the first ever White House Tribal Youth Gathering in Washington, D.C. in the summer of 2015.

Make sure to accept the challenge HERE.

As part of Generation Indigenous (Gen-I), the Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) is hosting a series of Gen-I Engagement Chats online for youth. We had our first chat two weeks ago and had a lot of great participation from youth, community members and tribal leaders. If you are a Native youth interested in learning more about the Gen-I Challenge, join CNAY on April 8 at 8:00PM EST for the second ONLINE chat!

The chat will focus on the Gen-I Challenge, with a special emphasis on taking the Challenge before the April 10 deadline to be eligible for the first ever White House Tribal Youth Gathering. Participants can ask questions about the Challenge, share updates on their progress, talk through their process in completing the Challenge and discuss issues that Native youth face. More information about the Gen-I Engagement Chat is provided below.

Chat Details:

  • Date: April 8
  • Time: 8:00 PM EST
  • Where: www.gen-i.chatango.com (directions below)
  • Topic: Gen-I Challenge
  • Discussion Question: Why should foundations and corporations support and invest in Native youth?

Chat Instructions:

To join the Gen-I Engagement Chat, you will go to www.gen-i.chatango.com. Once you get to the chat platform, click “Set Name” in the bottom right hand corner so we know who is on the call. You don’t have to create an account, but please be sure to create a temporary name with no spaces (example: ShoniSchimmel). Once you’ve created a name, you’re all set and ready to chat!

We hope you are able to join us for the April 8 chat! Just a reminder, there is no call-in information since this chat will occur online. Our next Gen-I Engagement phone call will happen on April 23 and we will share information as we get closer to that date. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to CNAY by contacting ryan.ward@aspeninstitute.org or (202) 736-2908

Native Youth, you are invited to attend a kickoff event for Generation Indigenous!  President Obama launched the Gen-I Initiative at the 2014 White House Tribal Nations Conference to focus on improving the lives of Native youth by removing the barriers that stand between Native youth and their opportunity to succeed. Through new investments and increased engagement, this initiative takes a comprehensive, culturally appropriate approach to ensure all young Native people can reach their full potential.

Join representatives from The White House, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Administration for Native Americans, and the Gathering of Nations Pow Wow for this exciting kickoff event!  Native youth in Grades 9-12 are eligible to attend on Thursday, April 23rd, to learn about Gen-I and to take the Gen-I Challenge to make a positive impact in your community!

The event will be held on Thursday, April 23rd, 11:30 AM – 4:00 PM at the Albuquerque Convention Center.  Registration will open at 11:30 AM, the event will begin promptly at 1 PM MDT.  Lunch will be provided.

We hope you can join us in celebrating, you, Gen-I and working with us toward a better future for Native Youth!

Please see the attached Save the Date flyer for more information.  If you are interested in attending, please Register Here. Registration is on a first come, first serve basis and will be capped at 300 participants.

Where

  • Albuquerque Convention Center

When:

  • Thursday, April 23rd at 11:30 AM MDT
  • Registration begins at 11:30 AM, the event will begin promptly at 1 PM MDT
  • The event will last approximately 4 hours.

Through ongoing outreach into Indian Country and listening sessions with Native youth, the Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) consistently hears that young people want to be engaged in a large network of their peers that also provides increased access to new and exciting opportunities and serves as a resource for their communities. In support of Gen-I, CNAY is excited to create a new leadership opportunity to engage and support a large network of “young movers and shakers” in Indian Country – Gen-I Youth Ambassadors.

What is a Gen-I Youth Ambassador? 
Gen-I Youth Ambassadors serve as spokespersons for Gen-I and CNAY. CNAY works closely with these youth to foster their development as community liaisons who share resources and opportunities with their peers and communities. Specifically, Gen-I Youth Ambassadors will:

  • Be eligible to participate in the first ever White House Tribal Youth Gathering; 
  • Be part of a growing Gen-I Network of community leaders and young experts in the field;
  • Serve as direct connections to tribal and urban Indian communities; and 
  • Provide their perspectives on priorities for youth in Indian Country. 
Becoming a Gen-I Youth Ambassador:
The Gen-I Youth Ambassador network consists of leaders between the ages of 14 and 24 who want to directly connect with CNAY, the Administration, and key stakeholders, and also actively promote Gen-I and encourage peers and communities to support and/or get involved in positive community projects.

  • Accept the Gen-I Youth Challenge;
  • Sign up as a Gen-I Youth Ambassador to be added to the National Native Youth Network map; and
  • Follow Gen-I on Facebook & Twitter

UPDATE: Youth who sign up for the Gen-I Youth Challenge BY FRIDAY, APRIL 10 will be eligible to attend the 2015 White House Tribal Youth Gathering in Washington, DC this summer!

CLICK HERE TO ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE TODAY!
https://aspeninstitute.wufoo.com/forms/geni-native-youth-challenge/

By signing up for the Gen-I Youth Challenge, you are agreeing to take the following steps to create positive change in your community:

Step 1: ACT. Within 30 days of accepting the challenge, work with other youth in your community or at your school to do something positive of your choosing (for example: do a volunteer project with a local organization or charity, visit with elders in your community, or become a mentor to a younger person). You can use Toolkits from the National Native Youth Network and their partners to help you in this work.  Your local tribal youth council, urban tribal youth group, or Native youth organization may also be resources.

Step 2:  CAPTURE. Document your community efforts through a short summary (3-4 sentences) and with photos and video!

Step 3: SHARE. Share your story online using #Gen-I and send to the National Native Youth Network here.  The National Native Youth Networkor the White House may even feature your story!

Step 4: PARTICIPATE. By participating in the National Native Youth Network, you may be invited to apply to send a representative to the first ever White House Tribal Youth Gathering in Washington, D.C. in the summer of 2015.

Make sure to accept the challenge HERE.